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Mladen Prajdić  I'm from Slovenia and I'm currently working as a .Net (C#) and SQL Server developer.

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Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

here's a select. don't run it just look at it and think what it returns:

SELECT 123.654, 123d6, 123e4, '123'e4

ok now run it.

the results are:

(No column name) d6 (No column name) e4
123.654 123 1230000 123

 

I lost 2 hours of debugging this little annoying as hell "feature" for 123d6 value.

i mean come on... where is the freakin' logic here???

why not just say error in parsing or something??

Print | posted on Thursday, November 02, 2006 11:41 AM |

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# re: Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

select 1from sysobjects;
SELECT top 1a from (select 1 a) a;
SELECT 123'col2';
11/3/2006 7:52 AM | Alexander Gladchenko
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# re: Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

select'4'bag;
11/3/2006 10:07 AM | Alexander Gladchenko
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# re: Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

isn't that annoying as hell? at least to me it is...

i really wish that would be syntacticaly wrong.
11/3/2006 10:08 AM | Mladen
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# re: Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

If you'd ever written a yacc/lex parser, especially one for SQL, you'd be familiar with these kind of 'features'. In short, white-space isn't the only thing that can separate grammatical elements, if those elements can be 'lexed' separately................
11/6/2006 9:59 AM | Mark Buckle
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# re: Annoying SQL Server "bug feature"

In my home language, we have a proverb stating that a knowledgable person needs only half a word. Well, computers are not knowledgable (yet) so, give them a "full" word. ;-D
11/7/2006 6:10 AM | Johan
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