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Hi! My name is 
Mladen Prajdić  I'm from Slovenia and I'm currently working as a .Net (C#) and SQL Server developer.

I also speak at local user group meetings and conferences like SQLBits and NT Conference
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SQL Server MVP

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October 2010 Blog Posts

SQL Server Transaction Marks: Restoring multiple databases to a common relative point

We’re all familiar with the ability to restore a database to point in time using the RESTORE WITH STOPAT statement. But what if we have multiple databases that are accessed from one application or are modifying each other? And over multiple instances? And all databases have different workloads? And we want to restore all of the databases to some known common relative point? The catch here is that this common relative point isn’t the same point in time for all databases. This common relative point in time might be now in DB1, now-1 hour in DB2 and yesterday in DB3....

posted @ Wednesday, October 20, 2010 8:00 AM | Feedback (1) | Filed Under [ SQL Server ]

SQL Server – Undelete a Table and Restore a Single Table from Backup

This post is part of the monthly community event called T-SQL Tuesday started by Adam Machanic (blog|twitter) and hosted by someone else each month. This month the host is Sankar Reddy (blog|twitter) and the topic is Misconceptions in SQL Server. You can follow posts for this theme on Twitter by looking at #TSQL2sDay hashtag. Let me start by saying: This code is a crazy hack that is to never be used unless you really, really have to. Really! And I don’t think there’s a time when you would really have to use it for real. Because...

posted @ Tuesday, October 12, 2010 7:00 AM | Feedback (12) |

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